July 17, 2014

1975 Mark Heater Core Replacement

Hello

I recently started restoring my 75 Mark IV Blue Diamond Edition. I've gone through the entire ignition and fuel system and am about to start the cooling system.

Could you give me some insight as to how hard it is to replace the heater core to prevent future failure? I've read manuals and they seem to show a Mark IV with this year as being relatively easily. Many thanks for any help and for operating your wonderful website.

Steve

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Greetings Steve -

If you are wanting to replace the heater core in your 1975 Mark IV, you will indeed find it relatively easy depending on your skills and if you have the "correct" Shop Manual.

The heater core replacement is shown on page 36-45-11 in the 1975 Manual in the T-bird, Cougar, Montego manual a/c-heat section. The operation which involves splitting the heater plenum under the dash, behind the glove box is described step by step and is followed up with great illustrations. The factory shop manual is a great asset for anyone who is maintaining or restoring a classic car, and we can supply you with them.

We are pleased that you are enjoying the Lincoln Land Blog.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 16, 2014

1968 Continental Steering Issues

Bill -

Having trouble with my Lincoln Continental steering. It makes a loud popping noise when turning the wheel and some times seems like it's missing as you can turn the wheel with no response and then a loud pop and the wheels will move. Any advice?

Russell

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Russell -

From your email I assume and find it strange that nobody has been asked to inspect the steering and front suspension on your 68 Lincoln as yet. Of course I haven't seen or road tested the car either. After reading your email several times though my advice for you is to immediately park that vehicle and have it towed to an automotive front end shop for a complete inspection. I would expect that more than one item is in need of attention a.s.a.p. and that other components are worn and recommended for replacement. Let us know what you find out.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 14, 2014

1968 Continental Choke And Poor Start Issues

Hi Bill,

Hello from Australia... I have a question re my 68 Continental.

I have a choke heater pipe which has rusted through which as I understand it, means that the higher cold start idle stays for longer; it settles soon as the engine warms up.

However, would this also be responsible for the fact that the car is very hard to start when cold?

Despite activating the auto choke by pumping there gas a few times it can take up to 5 or 6 goes to get her to fire. If I remove the air filter squirt a little ether mix (we have a great product here called 'Start Ya Bastard'...really) directly into the carb she fires up.

Is the choke heater pipe to blame for poor starting too? Or do I have another issue to explore?

Thank you so much for the blog. It's very useful. Especially here where Lincolns are a bit thin on the ground!

Ed

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Greetings Ed -

You are correct when you believe that the rusted through choke heater tube should have nothing to do with the poor cold engine starts. It functions only to guide the necessary heat to the bi-metallic choke coil in order to slowly open the choke as the engine warms up to operating temperature. What will affect fast cold engine starts on a normally good running engine are.....A choke valve that is not FULLY closed when the engine is cold, a fuel delivery system and carburetor that cannot supply an abundance of fuel to the intake manifold when the accelerator pedal is pumped on a cold engine, poor quality fuel, an under maintained / maladjusted ignition system or a worn out engine with poor compression etc. When the engine is cold, good maintenance to all of the above items is very important and work together for quick cold engine starts.

I like the name of your starting fluid. It is very appropriate and always brings a smile when I hear it said. Good luck with diagnosing your starting problem.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 11, 2014

1963 Continetal Heat-AC Issues

What would we do without you Bill.

My 63 sedan is having activation issues when selecting heat and a/c. While replacing the brake booster I noticed that vacuum lines were loose from the "passenger side" as well as engine compartment side of the vacuum hose (for lack of a better word) router for heat and a/c selections.

Page 30 of the supplement for 62 and 63 shows a shield style (lacking a better word) for routing the vacuum lines thru the fire wall. My lines are coming thru a rectangular router which is not shown in the manual and subsequently I have no diagram to show what color hose comes thru the ports of the router.

Exacerbating the problem, the car is from a desert climate and color has dried up and flaked off the lines so a diagram of the rectangular router with line color indicated for the ports is important for my work here. I would really like Chris's shop to do the work bit distance makes that impossible.

Your thoughts and possible advice will be really appreciated Bill.

My Best Regards,

Bob

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Greetings Bob -

We are pleased that you enjoy the Blog.

Your vacuum problems with the ac/heat controls may also include vacuum motors and the main selector switch. If your rubber vacuum hoses are deteriorating though and will not seal properly as you seem to be describing, the first important repair that you should do is replace them all.

It is very important to choose a hose product that is of a high quality in order to have a long lasting repair. Some available products unfortunately have a short durability period.

The 62-63 supplement that I have shows the 63 vacuum diagram with color codes on page 33. It is a Canadian FoMoCo publication and would be all that I have to work with. Your manual should have this schematic as well. Some owners will even color code the new hoses for authenticity and show car reasons. At the time that you are replacing these hoses, the various vacuum motors can be tested at this time. Anywhere that the vacuum hoses are routed can be a candidate for a leak or a failed component.

The selector switch itself would be high on this list. No leaks are wanted of course but the ability of the system to operate decently can be based on the total sum of the leaks in the vacuum system. Small leaks and seepage however will be tolerated somewhat and unnoticed.

We may be able to supply you with quality hoses for this job. When you call us, ask to speak to Erik and mention this blog question. If possible he will arrange to send you the quality hoses that we like to use.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 9, 2014

1978 Continental Blower Motor Issues

Bill -

I have a question. I'm working on a car at work and i'm having problems with the blower motor. I'm not getting any power to the resistor at all. If i put power directly to the blower motor or the resistor , the blower will work. But like i said I'm not getting any power to the blower or the resistor. I would like to know where the fuse and relay for this is located. Also if you would have any other ideas as to what would cause this.

Daniel

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Greetings Daniel -

With systems such as Automatic Climate Control one should always have the wiring diagram close at hand when performing any diagnoses on them. The two fuses for the ATC system should be located in the fuse box under the dash on the left side. There will be a 20 amp ( a/c clutch coil) and a 25 or 30 amp fuse. The high blower relay on the firewall is also fed by a fuse link from the battery.

If the blower motor does not operate in any position my best guess would be that the High Blower Relay is faulty and is an excellent item to be tested first. If proven faulty, we can replace or rebuild this relay for you. Do you have access to the wiring diagram or service manual? If not, call us and we can arrange to supply any that you may need.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 8, 2014

1987 Town Car Vacuum Leak Sound

Dear Bill,

I have a 1987 Lincoln 5.0 Town Car that has a vacuum leak sound coming from under the dash, but when in drive it goes away as I accelerates. What is causing the problem.

Eddie

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Hello Eddie -

If you have a vacuum leak sound coming from under the dash I would agree that you must have a vacuum leak. The sound diminishes when you accelerate because engine supplied vacuum drops during acceleration. To find out what is causing the leak, someone with a good ear needs to look and listen under the dash for a vacuum hose disconnect or a leaking vacuum component etc. It should be easy to locate.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 7, 2014

1976 Mark IV Power Seats

Hi Bill -

Thank you for any help you can provide. I am going to purchase this beautiful, 1 owner, garage kept car....I love it and it is immaculate. The only thing is..BOTH the power seats don't work! (I am 6'4" and my wife is 5'0") Any clues as to what it could be? Have you heard of this before? Again...any suggestions would be highly appreciated!!

Bill

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Hello Bill -

You haven't purchased the vehicle as yet so you are unable to provide much information except that the power seats do not work. The only way to determine why they do not work is by testing the electrical circuits to the seat motors. I could send you a list of parts that are possibilities but the list would be too long and expensive for you to purchase the parts on speculation alone. If this 76 Mark IV is a real nice car and you are paying a high dollar for it why not have the seller make some sort of an allowance in cash for the repair or agree to have it repaired for you.

Some possibilities as to why they are not operating could be....disconnected electrical at the seats, mechanism seized in place due to years of non use, fatigued and broken door jamb wiring etc. So as you can see Bill, some diagnosis must be performed at your end in order to come close to an accurate answer for these issues.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Continental Sedan Electrical Questions

I just purchased my first Lincoln, 1969 Continental with suicide doors an I love it. It has power windows and all the motors are good, however the door switches work on all but the passenger side front. I hot wire the motor and the window goes up and down, seems to only get power for the cigarette lighter. The driver door switch does not work for the passenger main window either, however I did get the quarter window working, but only from the driver side. I ordered a wiring diagram hoping this might clear up where the driver door links to the passenger door but who knows.

Thank You,

Matt

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Greetings Matt -

Yes, having the wiring diagram is the only way to diagnose electrical issues pertaining to the power windows in a logical manner. With a GOOD diagram and a 12v test light you will be able to trace the power path through the switches to and from the pw. motors.The power window circuits are complicated on these cars as you will find out and servicing and /or replacing switches is very popular here at Lincoln Land. Problems can also be found in the motor drive gears and window regulator lubrication areas.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Mark III Electrical Issues & Update

Good Afternoon Bill,

Hoping you can help me with what I hope is a minor electrical malfunction on my Mark III. I just recently did some major work in the engine bay and put everything back together. This problem was not present before this project. I am getting a draw and I believe I have it narrowed down to the ignition system, specifically the wire from the ignition switch to solenoid (hopefully).

Basically, when I connect the battery (with the ignition switch off (no key in switch)), for all intents and purposes, the car is now "on". The seatbelt light illuminates when I connect the battery. For a week or two, aside from that, everything else operated as normal, save for the fact that I had to disconnect the battery whenever I parked the car to prevent it from being drained.

Now, when I attempt to shut the engine down, I can turn the lock cylinder off, take the key out, and engine is still running! I have to pull the wire off of the "I" terminal at solenoid to turn engine off. This leads me to believe it is a faulty ignition switch. So I replaced the switch, to no avail. I'm out of ideas. I'm not entirely familiar with how that part of the ignition system works on this car so I'm hoping you can lend some insight as to what the problem may be. It's rather inconvenient, to say the least.

Thanks for any help you're able to offer,

Dan

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Dan -

From the sound of your email it would seem at first glance that you have re- connected your wiring incorrectly somewhere near the starter solenoid or the solenoid has failed internally. Since I do not know what or if any wiring that you have handled is in fact assembled incorrectly or if the solenoid has become faulty you will first need to examine the wiring and compare it with the correct "Start and Run Circuit" wiring diagram for the car. This is called "backtracking" and is the best place for you to start. Do you have the shop manual or a wiring diagram?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hello Bill,

Thanks for your response. When I removed the wiring, I left everything connected (to solenoid, junction block, etc.) I disconnected only at main connector near firewall.

A faulty solenoid did cross my mind. I guess the next thing I need to know is this: Is the wire that gets connected to the "I" terminal on the solenoid supposed to be "hot" with the battery connected and ignition switch off? At this point, if I remove the brown wire from the solenoid, I have 12 volts there with the ignition switch off.

I do have a shop manual and I have looked at the wiring diagram for the starting circuit but I don't know how to tell what has constant battery power and what doesn't.

Thanks!

Dan

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Dan -

It sounds like you have a bad starter solenoid. That "I" terminal should have no power at the solenoid or the brown wire from the wire harness when the key is off. If you have power there at the terminal with the key off with the brown wire disconnected the solenoid should be replaced. If the brown wire is powered when disconnected the the problem is elsewhere.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 1, 2014

1963 Continental Convertible Questions

Hi Bill -

Thanks for the Blog and info - it's really great and really appreciated!

I have a 63 Continental Convertible that's been in my family for about 25 years - mostly sitting in a garage unfortunately. Recently I started on a mission to get it started again. New starter solenoid, new starter, new battery, new battery cables and starter cable. Got it cranking! Changed oil and filter, drained as much bad gas from (an almost empty) tank as I could and added 10 gallons of fresh gas with a can of Sea Foam. Rebuilt carb, did a full tune up (plugs, wires, cap, condenser, points, new coil, fuel and air filters.

Amazingly it started up pretty easily at that point and ran pretty great for about a month of idling and putsing around my neighborhood. 2 days ago I tried to start it and it was a real bear to start - missing really bad and it was tough to keep it running. And all of a sudden a new valve/lifter tapping noise from the passenger side. Pulled the passenger side valve cover off and there is indeed a bent/broken valve. So I'm guessing I need to have a full valve job done not just having one valve replaced - correct? (Everything under the valve cover is really black and sludged up BTW).

If indeed I do need a valve job - what else should be done at the same time while having this done? Other than the bent valve - what else should be re-used/replaced? And what may have caused this to happen and how can I avoid it from happening again? Should the oil pan be removed and screen, oil pump, everything "down there" be cleaned up as well? Thank You VERY Much Again!!!

Robert

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Robert -

After reading your post several times it would appear that the least that you will need to have done is a complete valve job along with new lifters. If your problem was only a bent push rod or two and NOT a bent valve you could easily replace these and continue monitoring the situation as the engine hopefully clears itself of the sticking valve problems. Not knowing the actual condition of the engine and after reading your statements about the length of time that the car has sat with the engine not being started and your description of the amount of sludge in the engine indicates that other problems could possibly surface at a later date if you don't consider some further inspection at this time. Engines that sit unused with old acidic and sludgy oil usually do not fare well in many cases when they are finally revived. The decision of how far to actually go should be left up to the technician who is performing the work. You may be lucky and get away with only a valve job but the fact that there is an apparent sludge build up in the engine tells me that the engine was poorly maintained with regard to necessary scheduled oil changes etc. If it was my Lincoln I would also remove the oil pan and examine the engine bearings and measure bearing clearances as well as replace the oil pump and valve lifters. The timing gears and chain are other items for consideration as the original cam gear is aluminum with nylon teeth that do crack and fail with age. All of the sludge should be rinsed out at this time of course. The final assessment however is best left up to the expert engine technician who is on scene and will be performing the work for you as I have mentioned above. We wish you a speedy repair and good decisions.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Good Afternoon Bill -

Thanks Again so much for your insight and advice on our last email correspondence - I/we really appreciate it!. I'm sorry to bother again - I'll try my best not to dominate your time and wear on your patience and generosity! :) I have a follow up question/concern I hope you can help me with. This might be my last attempt before I try to find a local mechanic/shop. (Which if you know/recommend anyone in South Florida - West Palm Beach area.) I replaced the bent pushrod (I called it a bent valve on my email to you - sorry!) and was able to "loosen" the stuck valve (WD-40 and a hammer) - 4th from the back on the passenger side and the car started up and ran "perfectly". For a minute or so. Then it started to miss and run very poorly. Would not hold idle. All of the valves, springs, rockers, pushrods, etc visually looked to be operating as they should - including the one valve/spring that had previously been stuck. I also noticed moisture (not smoke) blowing from the exhaust - could see patch/ring of it on the driveway under each muffler (previously there had been a little oily black "soot" and a little oily smoke - kinda normal I'm guessing for a car that had been sitting for 5 years and just started? - but not this much moisture) - it is/was possibly coolant (?). I thought maybe I hadn't torqued the four rocker arm bolts tightly enough with my "standard" ratchet and possibly coolant was entering from the head and/or manifold (?) - so I re-torqued them a little bit more with a longer/beefier ratchet (don't have a torque wrench though). Thats all I loosened/tightened - nothing else (other than the valve cover). I then tried starting the car again with the same results - except that in the middle of my "trying" for about 30 seconds it ran perfectly again. Then started to miss and now backfire every now and then (a couple times through the carb and a few times through the exhaust - a couple pretty good ones). The next day after being up all night "researching" I tried again. Same results - but again for about 30 seconds in the middle of my "trying" the engine ran "perfectly". But the engine then reverted back to misfiring and again occasionally a backfire. I also noticed that the moisture no longer appeared to be as bad from the tailpipes - but now it was more of a mild oily black "soot" (like it had been before when the engine had been running "fine". ) Hope you can help - I'm a rookie mechanic on a shoestring budget. But I would love to get this old girl running again...Thank You VERY MUCH Bill! Robert

For full disclosure - and if it is applicable...

Exhaust appears to be shot - in just a quick look I saw a hole or two on the "bottom" of both resonators and a hole or two on a couple of the pipes. (Ugh!) The backfiring made things much worse - you now can hear a negative change in the cars sound and hear/see exhaust leaks...(Again Ugh!)

When I was loosening the rocker arm to replace the bent pushrod - I noticed moisture ran down from the area behind one of the bolts as I loosened it (second bolt from the back - passenger side). I was thinking initially this had just been oil - was this possibly coolant?

Pulled the 4 spark plugs on the passenger side and 3 looked OK - the 4th ("same" 2nd from the back - passenger side - which was the one below the stuck valve) was covered in oil - probably from me working the valve to try to free it up and the WD40 I used. I cleaned/dried and it looked fine - then reinserted.

I double checked the correct firing order of the plug wires to the distributer. They are correct.

When loosening and tightening the (4) rocker arm bolts I alternated with each turn or so (as I think you are supposed to do).

Unfortunately I don't have a timing light or the knowledge/skill to check the timing and I don't think I have the ability/tools to check compression.

To recap/close - fresh fuel with a little Sea Foam added (didn't drain the tank but got out as much of the old/bad fuel as I could before I even started any of this other "work"), new fuel filter, cleaned and rebuilt carb, new points/condenser/rotor/cap, new coil, new wires/plugs, new air filter, oil change and new oil filter.


Thanks Again!!!


Robert

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Hi Robert -

Your latest email only underscores my suggestions and possibilities to you in our first reply. It appears that replacing the bent pushrods in your engine is not working in your case and that a valve job is in order here. The sticking valves situation seems to be worsening. The car should really be in the hands of an expert engine technician for the actual diagnosis as I have previously mentioned, because I of course cannot see exactly what is going on with your engine from here.

As for the confusion as to what the liquid is that you are seeing at the tailpipe I can tell you that water vapor will appear in this area at certain times. The other liquid (oil or antifreeze) that is appearing at other locations in the engine can only be determined by someone on scene with the engine.

We do have several offerings of exhaust qualities available for your Lincoln and someone in our office may know of a willing engine technician at your location. Call our office and mention the blog to discuss the possibilities.

Keep in mind though Robert that if you are a "rookie mechanic on a shoestring budget" as you state, with a 1963 Lincoln Convertible that needs much work, you will be a very busy man. We wish you all the luck and great success. When you finally have the car in good running order you can be proud and you will have a beautiful automobile to drive.

Sincerely,

Bill