August 21, 2014

1966 Continental Turn Signal Issues

Hi Bill,

I have read your online Lincoln tips and info and have found some very useful stuff. Thank you for sharing! Can you please help me with a particular issue I'm having on a friend's 66' Continental?

The turn signals were not working until recently. Turns out someone had installed the incorrect turn signal relay. I found a used one to install and it mostly fixed the problem. Now when I turn on the left signal, the front and rear lights blink normally like they should. However, when I turn on the right signal, the front light blinks normally but BOTH rear lights blink. I have heard that this could be a grounding issue, but I don't know which ground(s) to investigate. Have you ever heard of this and do you have any advice? I recently installed a new reproduction turn signal switch just so you know. It's a tilt wheel type.

Another problem is that the horn does not work. I have not done much investigating yet but I do see that the horn relay is available online to purchase. Do these go bad very often? I'm guessing not but will be curious if you have any ideas.

Again, thanks for your online postings! I hope to hear from you.

Sincerely,

Jerry

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello Jerry -

As you know the turn signal switch on a 66 Lincoln with tilt steering wheel is cable operated and is mounted on the lower column area. If you feel however that an electrical ground is faulty then you need to carefully trace each light position with a test light or continuity tester for a possible bad ground. The t/s switch mounting is adjustable therefore my first check though would be for proper adjustment of this switch before any other tests. A small adjustment here can possibly be your problem and could correct the issue. One other area of concern is the four-way flasher switch in the glove box. We have seem some that have melted contacts which have caused strange lighting problems. The melted part should be visible on the exterior when examined carefully. If none of the above helps then you need to trace the circuits with the use of the correct wiring diagram. That year of Lincoln has a complicated turn signal circuit for some unknown reason.

The horn circuit on these cars is the same as most other horn circuits. Since you state that you haven't even looked at it yet, I don't have anything to work with except that it does not operate. Common horn problems that we see at Lincoln Land are .....faulty horn units, missing horn units, unplugged horns, faulty relays, faulty wiring and or horn contacts at the steering wheel sw. and loss of power in the circuit etc. So as you can see this is another circuit that would need to be diagnosed in a logical sequence with the use of the wiring diagram and a test light. A good place to start diagnosing would be at the relay which that Lincoln should have. I would never just go out and purchase a horn relay or any other parts without proving that the part was actually defective. Another fact to know is that the tilt wheel horn system on the 1966 Lincoln has a different circuit than a fixed wheel as the fixed wheel system does not use a horn relay. The electrical circuits on these vehicles can be very complicated and that is why a correct wiring diagram is a must for correct diagnosis and most electrical repairs.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 18, 2014

1970 Mark III Power Brake And Vacuum Issues

Hi Bill -

I just purchased a 1970 Mark III and after a week of learning and hassles, I have finally got Urzula back on the road. I have replaced the original intake manifold and carb with a new Edelbrock setup, but now I am having a couple issues. Most importantly my brakes have lost, seemingly, the power assist. I have checked vacuum going to the booster and while it is present I don't know how much vacuum is there. I now have it directly connected to the rear port of the carburetor. Furthermore I was negligent in my documentation and could very well be completely missing a vacuum hose. I have consulted the 1970 shop manual and can't make out the problem. When I step on the brakes, there is a "heavy clicking" for lack of better description, while depressing the brake until it starts braking. Phew. Hope that is enough for an idea, and some much needed help!

Thanks,

Scott

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Scott -

After reading your post a few times it seems as if you have lost power brake assist after you have replaced the intake manifold and carburetor. The power brake booster needs to receive a large volume of vacuum as provided by the original style intake manifold and carburetor. The vacuum required is such that if you disconnect the supply hose to the booster with the engine running at idle the engine will stall or run extremely rough. Since you seem to be unsure of how much vacuum you now have available at the booster, I think that you should pursue that avenue first. If the power booster is not defective but the vacuum to it is found to be low you then may need to consult with the supplier of your new non original manifold and carburetor in order to find out how to supply the needed vacuum to the booster with their manifold. We are familiar with mostly the factory designs in that regard. They may even have some sort of adapter available for this purpose if your present booster vacuum is insufficient. If your shop manual is the factory 1970 FoMoCo shop manual there is a section in Volume one that describes a booster test. If it happens that you need further booster help or replacement please call our office and ask for Al.

Sincerely,

Bill

1979 Fuel Delivery Issues

Hi Bill,

I am the proud owner of a 79' Continental. I am having issues with the fuel delivery system, as in non fuel is being delivered to the carb. The first step I took was to remove the fuel line from the filter and have someone pump the gas to ensure that there was in fact no fuel being delivered. Next I assumed that the fuel pump was bad, so I headed down to auto zone and bought a replacement, I changed it but before I hooked up the fuel lines I had someone pump the line again while I held my finger over the intake. No suction, damn. So either I put the arm that does the pumping in wrong or the mechanism that activates the pump is not working. Please advise oh great ruler of all things Lincoln.


My sincerest regards,

Zachary

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Zachary -

I don't understand what you mean by "had someone pump the line again" or how you are really testing those pumps. In any case and if you think that it is the pumps that are not working, you or a knowledgeable technician could first bench test both pumps for pumping action and at the same time you can check to find out if the new pump has the same pump lever configuration as the original pump. It is rare but not unheard of for the pump eccentric that drives the pump lever to fail. Other very popular fuel delivery problems to consider are plugged filters, rusted/ flaking fuel tank interiors, rusted/perforated fuel lines and rusted and broken fuel sending unit inlet tubes in the tanks. Of course any fuel line perforations can cause the pump to draw air instead of fuel and may not immediately show up as an external fuel leak. Correct diagnosis by someone familiar with the system is important to avoid unnecessary parts replacement and labor.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 14, 2014

1967 Continetnal Power Steering Pump Leak

Bill -

I bought the car a few months ago. The power steering was out. I removed the pump and found it had a lot of play in it and had pushed the rear seal out of it. I sent it off to be rebuilt. It came back nice and tight. I installed it and put everything back together. I ran it and it started leaking from the front. I removed it again and the play is back. What could be causing this? The front seal still looks good?

Randy

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello Randy -

The Eaton crankshaft mounted pumps are known to develop leaks and other problems as the seals etc. age. We sell seal kits and a rebuilding service for these pumps and find them to be very reliable pumps and usually trouble free. Of course there are sometimes exceptions that need to be dealt with. Your question, why yours is leaking after a rebuild is valid but should only be answered by the rebuilder of your pump. Most rebuilders will be anxious to remedy the situation for you immediately and will want you to return it to them for inspection. If however we can be of further assistance please contact our office.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 13, 2014

1970 Mark III Vapor Lock vs. Ignition Heat

Hi Bill,

I have had a 1970 Mark III for about 10 years. It is well used with 145,000 miles, but remains a great driver - has always been reliable.

I installed a re-manufactured Autolite 4300 (original equipment) carb on it and also upgraded to the Pertronix electronic ignition system and have also installed a rebuilt original alternator. The battery is about 3 years old, but spends winters on a trickle-charger.

She got a complete tune-up about two years (<1,000 miles) ago - new plugs, wires, cap, rotor, etc. To run at factory timing settings I run 50% racing fuel (110 octane leaded) plus 50% 93-octane unleaded. The above combinations have led to a car that starts, runs and drives smoother than any other Mark III I've ever driven (which is not a statistical sampling - I've driven only about four of them).

Last weekend, while stuck in stop-n-go traffic on the interstate, she died on me. I let it sit for 15-20 minutes and she started right up and got me the rest of the way home incident-free.

I wrote this off to vapor lock.

Yesterday, it did it again, three separate times - each time requiring a doubling of the cool-down time before she would re-start (1/2 hour, then 1 hour, then 2 hours).

Each time, I did a bit more diagnosis to determine it may not have been a fuel delivery issue (vapor lock), but instead may have been an overheating ignition system - as the coil, distributor cap, rotor and vacuum advance were all too hot to touch the last two times.

The last time, I also checked my distributor cap and rotor and even though they were relatively new, they were scorched at the contacts pretty badly - so I replaced them. Even after this, I had to wait another hour for more cool-down time before she would start.

In my 10 years of ownership, I've had a few incidents of worn-out wires needing replacement and I suspect this to be another example.

However, my Pertronix unit is also about five years (not more than 5,000 miles) old. I'm wondering if it might be dying as well.

Any other ideas for what might be causing excessive resistance in the ignition system? ...and do you agree this is where I should focus (not the fuel system).

(I'm ruling out vapor lock because after 15-20 minutes of cool down, I can visually see fuel flowing through the carb jets when I pump it - but was careful not to flood it).

Any insights you can offer would be appreciated.


Best regards....

Chris

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Chris -

We don't generally have any reports of vapor lock problems with Mark III's or any 460 cid Ford engines. I also have no idea if the fuel combination that you are using would contribute to vapor lock. The cars that we service use good local fuel that is easily available. As an experiment you could try a fill up with some local high octane only of a different brand as a test. I assume that your cooling system is in excellent working order and that the engine is not overheating when the engine suddenly stops. Of course as you suggest the ignition system could also be the culprit and the Pertonix being electronic could easily be a suspect. You will first need to determine if it stalls because of "lack of fuel" or" lack of ignition" during the actual stalling event and then diagnose that problem. If a fuel delivery test procedure for instance turns up poor fuel delivery when hot, the problem may be a failing fuel pump. Lack of ignition when hot may prove to be the Pertronix. The best test on the Pertronix is to substitute a good known unit. If I was to install a Pertronix in any of my vehicles I would always carry a spare unit in the trunk. You could also contact Pertronix and ask them how to test their module.

Sincerely -

Bill

August 11, 2014

1979 Mark V Collector's Series AC Question & Follow Up....

Hello Bill -

I have a 1979 Lincoln Mark V Collector Series and my A/C seems to come in and out during acceleration? Sometimes it seems like the air is blowing, sometimes it's not blowing and the air is warm or hot coming in through the vents? Any info you have on a problem like this? It seems really weird that it seems connected to the acceleration? The a/c works great when the car is just idling, no loss of power at all?!!!

Thanks

Ron K.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello Ron -

You are correct. The problem is showing up for you on acceleration because the system is designed to default to heat and full defrost in the event of vacuum loss. Acceleration under load reduces vacuum. When you have a small vacuum leak or a check valve failure etc. the system will drift towards heat until the engine vacuum stabilizes again when you release the pedal. We have addressed this issue several times on the blog and you should be able to navigate to these earlier replies. They all explain that having a vacuum diagram on hand is the best way to diagnose the problem. If you need such a diagram or referral to the previous posts please contact our office. Good luck on an easy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bill -

Thank you for your insight into this problem and pointing me in the right direction. I will need to get 1 of those vacuum diagrams and start the process of elimination. I'm glad I found you and look forward to learning about this wonderful piece of "art" and passing it on to my sons, so they too, can help preserve a piece of America's automobile history.

Thanks Again,

Ron

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Ron -

Thank you for your courteous reply. What you have thanked us for is exactly what the Lincoln Land blog is all about. We want to help provide our customers with an insight into their sometimes difficult Lincoln issues and point them in the right direction to the correct diagnosis and repair. I always emphasize that the proper literature and some understanding on any given problem are two of the most important tools in any automotive workshop. With that and the information that we post many Lincoln owners can learn to uncover and repair some of the issues that develop in vehicles over the years.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 4, 2014

1973 Mark IV Vacuum Lines

Greetings from Denmark.

I have a 1973 Lincoln Mark IV. I am writing to you because I am looking for information about the vacuum hoses which runs to the distributor. Please see the photo. What is this (red arrow)? I am hoping you can tell me how this system works, and how I can examine whether it works as it should.

Sincerely,

Ben

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Greetings Ben -

Because of the multitude of factory running changes to the routing of vacuum lines and revision of controls and switches in the engine management and control systems during the production to many 70's vehicles I cannot begin to correctly explain the operation of these systems in your particular 1973 Mark IV. Anyone trying to do so would need the actual vehicle on site along with all of the Factory Shop Manuals and booklets that were available to the Dealers during that era of cars. You would then need to study the information in these manuals and read up on how they operate in order to diagnose problems or perform certain tune up procedures. We may be able to help you obtain some of these manuals if you do not already have them.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 1, 2014

1968 Continental Power Steering Issues

Bill -

I have a 68 Continental 462 that has a power steering leak only after running down the road.

It appears to be from the lines near the reservoir, or the reservoir. After it sprays fluid everywhere I can degrease it start it up turn wheel lock to lock and no leak.

What am I missing?

Thanks -

Nate

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Nate -

Well I don't think that you are really missing anything. The leak is just not surfacing when you are trying to find it. This is similar to finding an elusive slow leak in a tire. In your case the fluid leak may only begin when the oil is hot. I would drive the car on a short road test stopping periodically to observe under the car. When the leak appears, try to pinpoint it and then return to your service area and safely raise the car in order to look closely and find the culprit. This may take time and persistence on your part but you will be successful if you are patient. One part to consider is the rubber return hose from the reservoir to the pump. This hose is originally a special oil resistant hose but some owners have replaced them with heater hose etc. and they can decompose and fail in a short period of time.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 31, 2014

1967 Convertible Rear Window Issues

Hi Bill...

I'm hoping you can offer some insight into deciphering a situation with the right rear window. All relays were behind the seat have been checked and cleaned and appear to work well.

In my college years---a very long time ago---I was a bench technician in a television shop, so I'm not totally unfamiliar with electronics. I have the original factory repair manual and the supplement for the convertible top and automatic rear windows.

Here is a description of what's going on. It is an intermittent problem, but happens frequently. All the windows work normally from all the manual switches. The automatic window operation is normal on both sides. What is happening is occurring with the left door only. When I open the door the window goes down half-way and stops normally. The interior lights come on, as they should, as does the "door open" light on the dash. When I shut the door, the window goes up and the motor stops as it should; however, far too often the interior lights and "door open" light stay on.

The only way I've been able to get these lights to go off is to momentarily disconnect the battery. When I do, I can hear a click which sounds like it's coming from the left door post area where the retract and door open relay is located. Anyway when reconnecting the battery, the interior lights and "door open" lights are off and remain off until opening that door again. As I said, it doesn't happen every time, but far too often.

Any input you might have for this would be so much appreciated!... Before starting to tearing into things and, perhaps, ordering parts I don't need.

Thanks Bill!

Best,

John

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BEFORE BILL COULD EVEN ANSWER ...... WE RECEIVED THIS:

Thanks Bill I got the problem solved.

It was a need to adjust the current limiter relays. One of the fellows here had dealt with the same problem a while ago.

All that was necessary is to decrease the tension a bit on the internal coil springs (one in each relay) to allow the points to open with slightly less current flow.

John

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John -

We are pleased that you have corrected the issue with the "current limiting relay" for the problem rear door window area. The operation of these relays for the left and right rear door power windows and lights is based on the current draw in the system. Any adjustments should be carefully performed to the actual vehicle and circuit to which that relay is controlling. This is because as these circuits and their switches age, the values that the relay responds to changes as well. If the condition of the circuit and the switches is in poor shape they must be upgraded to a reasonably good condition. When diagnosing these complex systems the battery should always be in good shape and on charge while diagnosing in order to maintain an operational 12-13 volts. As a further tip the correct same relays for the left and right operation can be swapped for diagnostic purposes. If a suspected relay on the left side for instance causes the right side to fail when swapped, you have probably proven that relay to be faulty etc. Any adjustments should be done by a skilled technician with an understanding of the circuit's function and of course with the correct shop manual and wiring diagram close by.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 30, 2014

1967 Continental Wiper Issues

Hi Bill,

We have a 1966 Lincoln. We rebuilt the power steering pump, installed it and ran the car. Everything was OK, we tried the wipers, the wipers turned on, and now will not turn off or slow down. We checked the cable and arm movement, and vacuum release from the motor, everything seems to be operational. Can it be internally in the motor, or something in the lines.

Thank you,

Tom

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello Tom -

We have seen this exact problem with the wiper motor not turning off and if all adjustments and the vacuum bleed are OK it has always turned out to be an internal hydraulic problem in the wiper motor. When we replaced these faulty motors with good used ones the issue was resolved. You could try releasing the cable at the motor and working the control manually back and forth rapidly (engine running) to see if this will flush out the insides and then turn off correctly. If this fails you could also try disconnecting the hydraulic lines at the pump and flushing with medium compressed air pressure and fresh p/s fluid. If this problem only appeared after the pump overhaul I would suspect that some sort of debris could have been ingested into the wiper motor. Of course if the system appears contaminated this MUST also be corrected and the filter in the reservoir replaced. If the above results in no improvement please call us and ask to speak to Al for a possible further suggestion or wiper motor availability.

Sincerely,

Bill