September 15, 2017

1970 Mark - New Owner Questions

Hello Bill,

I just found your blog and I am very interested in it. I hope I do not make any faux pas in this first email. My late mother-in-law left a family heirloom to us after she passed. It is her originally owned 1970 Mark III that has been in storage for some time. I am trying to put it back on the road for occasional Sunday drives and have already completed a number of deferred maintenance issues. There are five items that I have not been able to resolve:

1) The hydraulic windshield wipers will not turn off.

2) The engine instruments will work sometimes and other times not. The ignition switch is very sloppy and the outside basil (?) can be pulled off exposing the key slot. It will fit back on and start the engine with no problems.

3) The drivers side window will not work. The motor sounds when the electric button is pushed but does not move. The window can be pulled up and pushed down by hand.
The small rear window on both sides do not work at all when the master control at the drivers station is pushed or when the individual stations are pushed.

4) I just had the A/C system switched over to the current type of coolant and had a new compressor installed and it worked fine the next few time that we drove the car. Yesterday, when activated, the compressor loads the engine but only hot air comes out of the vents, regardless of where the "TEMP" switch on the "AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROL" is set. Sometimes the fan will come on when the top lever is moved to LOW and to HIGH but after turning the engine off and then on the fan will not come on unless I move the top lever to DE-FOG or DE-ICE.

5) Do you have any suggestions or guidance on where I may find information on these systems? I realize, now, that it would have been better if I would have sent individual emails for each item. If you like I will break them down in individual emails.

Thank you in advance for any help that you may be able to give to me.

Bill

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Greetings Bill -

Congratulations on your 1970 Mark III purchase. They are great cars and are much admired by car collectors. With the issues that you are describing you have plenty of work and learning ahead. A wiring diagram as well as your Shop Manuals will be needed. Electrical skills etc. and some test equipment are also very necessary. Since you are reporting the problem items with no diagnosis information I can only advise you what usually fails on these items. You or your mechanic will need to do the diagnosis.

The wiper problem could be a maladjusted control cable, the vacuum hose to the wiper motor from the switch is not bleeding off after the windshield washer is activated ( both can be observed at the hydraulic motor by moving the access panel forward at the hydraulic hoses at the engine side of the firewall ) or the motor is internally defective.

The temp., oil and fuel gauges are powered by a single Instrument panel Voltage Regulator (IVR) located behind the clear plastic lens beside the gauges. The shop manual explains the operation and diagnosis very well.
Your description of the non operative drivers door window sounds like the popular window motor gear failure. We always have parts in stock for this problem. The quarter windows issue description indicates that they have been dormant for a long time and are stuck in position from lack of activity. Many times they can be reactivated with the use of a commercial high amp battery charger temporarily on the battery and the switch cycled to the UP and Down position until they start to operate. If this fails and the motor is receiving power, the mechanism inside the quarter panel will need to be partially loosened or disassembled until it moves. Of course there are other possibilities but this is the most common. When the windows are finally repaired, always lower them very very slightly when the car is stored to unload the motors and gears.

The ignition switch part that is sloppy and not attached will need to be disassembled as per the shop manual and observed for broken parts. We should have parts available at Lincoln Land.

Your Automatic Climate Control consists of the refrigeration system and its controls. Lack of cooling indicates the possibility of a leaking refrigerant issue but your report of the many other conditions tells me that there are several other problems that exist. These systems can be extremely complicated for those that have no experience however the shop manual is excellent in all respects with operation explanations and diagnosis procedures. We have parts available as well as professional testing and rebuilding of the ATC box and Servo.

At L.L. we see vehicles that have had many of cobbled up electrical and mechanical parts that can be a nightmare for a new owner. We wish you the best of luck in your diagnosis and timely repairs. We also look forward to supplying you with the needed parts.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 30, 2017

1975 Mark IV Wire Repair

Bill -

Good afternoon, I was checking the electric choke wire for the carb (someone had cut it off) so I pulled the tape off all the wires in that area. I found that the ground wire from the alternator to splice S-202 (according to my wiring diagrams), which splits the alt wire into four, had been broken very close to the splice. Naturally, someone had to skip doing it right and just twisted a new piece in as well as they could, which wasn't much. Needless to say, there isn't much left to connect to. My question is, where may I find a S-202 (shaped like a cylinder) or is there some other proper fix? Couldn't find anything specific on Google. Thank you.

Jim

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Jim -

Repairs such as you describe are usually simply improvised on scene by an automotive electrical technician with the proper use of a solder gun, solder, heat shrink if needed and then followed up with a professional wrap with electrical tape. These materials are available at local electrical suppliers along with any appropriate sleeve connectors etc. that are needed. FoMoCo never offered any repair instructions for any specific splices unless that splice or any other connectors became a common problem and required redesigning.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 22, 2017

1971 Mark III Brake Issues

Bill,

My Mark III had brake service performed by the previous owners at 90,000 miles, including rear wheel cylinders, shoes and hardware, front calipers, pads and hoses replaced. The system performed well and after I took delivery had it inspected for safety and everything checked out OK. At about 91K miles, it began demonstrating the tell-tale symptoms of a bad master cylinder: a slowly sinking pedal at stop signs and red lights. There was a little leakage behind the master cylinder onto the booster, and the old master cylinder looked a little too pitted inside to rebuild, so I replaced both. The booster holds vacuum and the push-rod is properly adjusted to a new master cylinder. However after bench bleeding the master cylinder and then using the two-man system to bleed the rest of the system on the car, I get a very soft pedal. It easily goes almost to the floor before the brakes "grab". This is when the engine is running with vacuum to the booster. The pedal is very hard when the engine if off. I've tried three master cylinders so far, at first assuming a bad master out of the box. I've tried bench bleeding using the bleeder tube system and the plugged outlet ports system until there's no more air or I'm not able to depress the piston further. Even though nothing else has changed on the brake system, I've checked all four wheels, the shoes are still adjusted to the drums and I find no loss of fluid anyplace. I haven't touched the Sure Track system or pressure differential valve except to temporarily disconnect the brake lines between it and the master cylinder to make room for the booster work. The common behavior I notice each time is that when I fill the reservoirs on the bench, fluid eventually drips only from the primary outlet port, never from the secondary port. I've read that each port should drip by gravity alone, and that some even bleed a car by gravity. Could this be a problem with multiple master cylinders, or is gravity bleeding from both ports not necessary here? Am I missing an adjustment someplace else? Is there a particular challenge getting all the air out of the system on this particular car? I want to be thorough and consider everything before I break down and tow it in.

Bradley

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Hi Bradley -

If all of the brake work, fluid bleeding and adjustments were performed properly as you describe, your sinking pedal does sound strongly like a classic by-passing master cylinder. Since we are not the supplier or the installers of your rebuilt master cylinders, I cannot comment on their quality.

However, since you are a local customer of Lincoln Land it may be a good idea for you to make an appointment with our service dept. for a professional on scene diagnosis. Doing this could save you further disappointment in the future.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 21, 2017

1978 Mark V Diamond Jubilee Dash Lights

Hey Bill -

I recently bought a 1978 Lincoln Mark V Diamond Jubilee Edition and there seems to be an issue with the lights. All exterior lights work and most of the interior except the instrument cluster. Not sure if there is a fuse for those lights specifically... I did change a fuse that said "inst. cluster" but it didn't seem to do anything besides stop my clock. All the warning lights work as well as the miles-to-empty gauge. So all the lights work besides the instrument cluster which wont light... Id appreciate any advice you can give me.

Thanks - Rocco

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Hi Rocco -

Nice cars those Marks. The Mark V is becoming quite popular among collectors. I can help you get started on diagnosis by explaining how the Instrument lighting is powered. The power for these lights does go through a small fuse in the fuse panel but this power originates at the instrument light dimmer that is integral with the headlamp switch. Possibilities for your issue are that the dimmer is merely rotated to the Off position or that the switch and rheostat itself is faulty. The above are only suggestions based on your information that must be verified with diagnosis. We can offer to test and repair your switch if necessary if you are unable to.

For DIY diagnosis you will require the Shop Manual, wiring diagram and a 12v test light. We usually have manuals and diagrams available . Trying to repair the electrical without some meaningful diagnosis usually results in frustration along with wasted time and parts.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 16, 2017

79 Stalls Out - Carb Issues

Hi Bill,

Josh here. I have a 79 Lincoln Continental and well, she idles really high. And I'm not sure how to tone it down, I've adjusted the carb idle screw. It wont turn anymore without the engine shutting off. It likes to stall out quite a bit. I'm guessing because of the same issue? When I shut off the key after running into town and she is all warmed up to op temp. She sputters for a few seconds and sometimes even about 15. Shakes the whole car then finally makes a sound like air out of a tire. Before shutting off. I was told that the timing is too advanced, I've been told to get a new carb. And I've been told to adjust the carb more. (Which I cannot) any help would be great. She will be going to a shop this Friday. It's 8/14/17

Sincerely,

Josh

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Greetings Joshua -

From your description, carburetor adjustment or a worn out binding carburetor does indeed seem to be your "too fast of an idle" problem. The adjustments for the various carburetors that were used in 1979 are clearly shown along with all of the other carburetor functions in the Factory Shop manual which you need to perform the adjustments. Unfortunately I cannot observe the state of adjustment, condition of your carburetor or even see if it is the original carb. with all of the original controls installed and functioning correctly. If you for any reason are unable to follow the adjustment procedures in the correct shop manual, someone local in your area with carburetor experience will need to do this for you. If we can be of further help with any parts for this repair please contact us again at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 27, 2017

1979 Mark V Heater Control Valve Question & Follow Up

Hi Bill,

Thought I needed a heater control valve I am in the processes of assessing the problem. I find I have no vacuum at the valve. Going through the manual I see I have a green hose, purple and a black, green going to heater valve, black has vacuum at the plastic manifold but doesn't continue to flow thru green hose to heater valve. When I jump the black hose (Vacuum) to green it operates the valve. Could there be a problem with the plastic manifold that I may not be seeing? There is also a thin cable with a rubber part that moves in that plastic manifold with the cable, don't know if that has an effect. Thanks so much.

Kenneth

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Hi Kenneth -

That green vacuum hose that routes to the water valve will only receive vacuum from the valve on the power servo when the system calls for full cooling and the power servo has pulled that thin wire on the servo valve to the extreme cooling position,. The water valve will receive no vacuum and be open in any other position. This operation is shown on page 36-74-3 of your Factory service manual. If this valve is receiving vacuum but cannot send vacuum to the water valve it could indeed be at fault. the rubber plunger inside of this valve is known to deteriorate and fail with age or if transmission fluid has intruded into the ATC vacuum system because of a vacuum shift valve leak at the transmission. The presence of transmission fluid at the servo valve under the dash will be evident.

If the complete power servo with the valve mounted properly on the side is sent to us we can test and evaluate it for you and possibly repair it for you. The mounting pins on that valve can be brittle and collapse so do not over tighten them.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Thanks Bill,

I may take you up on removing servo if nothing else pops up and forwarding it. I want to check the ATC switch if I can find it on the motor, also is there a test for the ATC temp sensor at glove box.

Thanks again, hope to hear back from you.

Kenny

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Hi Kenny -

Before you tear anything apart you need to be sure how that system operates. As I stated previously, that water valve does not close all the time for a/c, only in the maximum servo a/c position. You did not share the problem that you are experiencing with your ATC that prompted you to check this water valve. Read your manual carefully to know how each component operates. What issue prompted you to suspect a water valve problem ( no cooling, poor cooling etc. )?

Sincerely,

Bill

79 Collector's Series Sedan Interior Lights

Hi Bill,

I purchased a 1979 Lincoln Continental Town Car, Collector's Series about a week ago. Its a great car, but with anything that is almost 40 years old it has a few issues. I am baffled by the rear map lights. They come on when you open the doors/turn on the cabin lights on the dash. However, they will not turn on by the switch on the door panel itself. Now, when the lights are on and you flick the switch, then the lights will blink as the switch toggles on/off. However, once the lights shut off, the switch does nothing again. I don't think its a switch related issue as the lights seem to respond to the switch when they are already illuminated. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Anthony

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Greetings Anthony -

That lamp circuit is complicated and can be even more complicated to diagnose if you do not have the correct manual and wiring diagram. You can start by testing for power with a 12v test light at the light green/yellow tracer wire at the door switches. If there is no power there you will need to find out why with the use of the wiring diagram. If there is power there, the switch when activated should send power directed to that reading light only. Your owners manual should tell how and when these lights operate.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 18, 2017

1979 Mark V Hard To Start

Hi Bill -

Thank you for getting back to me on the A/C issue with my Mark V. I will share with my mechanic..

I have a new issue... I previously had my mechanic work on the carb to get it to where it starts just like the owners manual advises where if it sits idle for a few days or more, then depress the accelerator pedal two or three times. After I got the car back all was perfect with the cold start where I would do like the owners manual advises and it would start up in like 3-4 seconds in which I would let the choke warm up and then drive away no problem. In the past few months, the cold start process is taking longer each time even if starting the car the very next day. It will just crank and crank and then start after now up to 6-10 seconds. It never did that before and seems like each time the cold start process is taking longer each time I go to start it. Keep in mind that this is happening here in Phoenix, with a brutal heat wave in which some days the air temp is 118 degrees, and the car is stored in a enclosed storage facility. I had the mechanic replace the power valve twice in the carb now and I am wondering if that is the issue again, or is it the brutal heat or vapor lock? I had the gas tank cleaned out, and added fresh gas with a fuel stabilizer that they said I should use since I don't drive the card that often. By the way, when I drive the car, no problem at all with acceleration or deacceleration - it's just this recent cold start issue taking longer, and keep in mind I sometimes go to the storage facility to start it say on a sat morning and the temp outside is about 85-90 degrees. I also had a new fuel filter put on it as well. I appreciate your help with this new issue.

Bill

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Hi Bill -

Agreed, it does sound like a fuel mixture or fuel availability problem. Have your mechanic check the carburetor for cold choke operation and the availability of fuel from the internal carb air inlet under the choke butterfly to the engine from the accelerator pump while pumping but not cranking when the engine has been sitting COLD. Fuel in abundance must be available immediately for an instant cold start.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 10, 2017

1979 Mark V AC Questions

Hi Bill -

I have a 1979 Lincoln Mark V with 10K original miles and have a A/C issue.. When I bought the car I found out from my mechanic that the A/C compressor has a leak and would need to be replaced..It had already been converted to R-134 before so I had the compressor replaced and filled with R-134 again..This was done in early spring and it seemed to work fine but what the climate control system does is when you start the car and turn on the A/C it works fine..When you put it in drive and drive slow it still works fine however when you get on the highway and get it up to speed like over 30MPH approx and above with the A/C temperature selector set as low as it will go the climate control system kicks in and slightly warm air starts coming in from the floor heater ducts and a little from the dash and then the A/C will come back on and start blowing cold again and then back to the heat mode..Keep in mind here in Arizona when I drive it is above 100 Degrees F outside. The A/C should be blowing colder for a longer time and the climate control system is kicking the A/C out sooner than it should..I was wondering if it could be the A/C temperature control sensor that is bad and is not recognizing the true inside cabin temp inside the car..What are your thoughts??

Thanks,

Bill

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Hello Bill -

The system on your Mark does not cycle the compressor so therefor it is engaged all of the time that the Climate Control is on. The compressor will be off in the Vent position, the Heat position and in the winter when the ambient temp. is under approximately 35 degrees F. Loss of vacuum anywhere in the control system will cause a drift towards blended heat and defrost. You should check the ATC vacuum system as per the factory service manual for a vacuum leak or a vacuum servo internal leak. A system that is undercharged with refrigerant can loose some cooling at higher speeds because of refrigerant shrinkage but will not cause a default to the floor ducts. Did you check to see if any air was blowing out of the defrost ducts when the symptoms appeared? The ATC temperature sensor above the glove box assembly. can also be faulty as you suggest but it also cannot cause a default to heat at the floor ducts. Another possibility is some vacuum lines crossed under the dash or under the hood. Vacuum can leak anywhere that the vacuum is routed including the a/c vacuum reservoir and its Vacuum check valve. Engine vacuum can drop at higher speeds and if there is also a vacuum leak somewhere in the system, the controls cannot and will not maintain maximum cooling. I think that you will find that air is also blowing out of the defrost ducts when this heating occurs. In any case the a/c vacuum system should be tested in a logical sequence ( do not omit any a/c lines or vacuum motors) using the proper vacuum pump with a built in vacuum gauge and shop manual with the vacuum diagrams in order to pinpoint any leaks. Show this reply to your a/c mechanic. He may be experienced and able to locate the problem quickly. Some vacuum leaks can sometimes be spotted easily under the hood. We wish you a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 6, 2017

1968 Continental Will Not Turn Off

Hi Bill,

I have a 1968 4 door Lincoln Continental with the 462 engine. When I turn the key off the engine will not shut off, unless I turn the radio on?? I have replaced the Alternator and Voltage Regulator, but the problem has not gone away. It is like the coil is getting a back feed through the circuit somewhere. Any help you can give would be appreciated.

Thank you, Regards,

Aaron

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Greetings Aaron -

Some of these types of issues can be time consuming to diagnose but accurate diagnosis is very important. You need to know a few things about your car before trying to uncover the actual problem.

Did the problem begin after some" recent" repair or addition to the vehicle?

Do you have a non factory ignition system (Petronix etc)?

You could start testing at the ignition coil with the key in the off position and with the engine off. If you have power at the coil in this position you would need to test why power is available there in this off position. A proper wiring diagram and 12v test light is a must for the testing. The power path will lead from the coil to the ignition switch and also to the starter solenoid. A short inside the starter solenoid could cause the coil to be powered up with the key off. Unplugging that wire at the starter solenoid will remove the power to the coil if the solenoid is faulty. The other possibility is that the ignition switch or its electrical connection is shorted. Unplugging the ignition switch and carefully inspecting the plug will remove power to the coil if there is a problem in that area. You can observe the power at the ignition coil with every disconnect that you do to find out if that component is shorted etc.

I have no idea what the radio could have to do with your problem unless some unknown wiring deviation was added to your Lincoln. Do you know if any non factory wiring was ever added to your vehicle?

Sincerely,

Bill

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