January 30, 2015

1978 Mark V Blower Motor Issues

Hey Bill,

Just purchased a '78 Mark V and it has many problems.

One of which are the Door Lock Actuators, which I have ordered from Lincoln Land. However, another one has me stumped. The Blower Motor works on all speeds on every selection on the controls, except the heat selection. Have tried replacing the A/C - Heat controls and the same happens. This car has auto temp control. Any ideas would help.

Thanks,

Larry

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Hello Larry -

Congratulations on your recent purchase and we are pleased to have you as our customer. The problem of no blower operation in the heat selector position is caused 99% of the time by the failure of a part known as the Electro Vacuum Relay module which is located under the dash and up to the right of the transmission hump area. This unit is part of the blower delay feature that delays blower operation until the engine coolant warms up when the selector is positioned in the HEAT position. It is easily removed and replaced. The Shop Manual shows the location and as well explains the operation. Of course there is always an exception but as stated above this issue is 99% of the time caused by an electrical failure within this relay.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 27, 2015

1979 Mark New Owner Questions

Hi bill,

I just bought my "first" lincoln. Being a cadillac and camaro guy I was hesitant. But suet my first drive, ok I like it. ..a lot. With only 72000 miles and a couple little surface spots by the lower door area it was a steal at $1000. When I got home I noticed there was a knock or tap in the driver side head. Would fresh oil and maybe freshening up the leads on the OSU help this or should I just expect to go deeper? Also my throttle is sticking a little. And I'm curious if I can swap the carb from my camaros 350 (edelbrock 650 #1406?) And fix that issue or is it something different. I did notice online there was a recall for throttle sticking issues on the 77s. Any advise is great and thanks for the awesome feed here. I will read in full...and regularly.
Thanks again. Brian

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Hi Brian -

Congratulations on your recent Mark V purchase. They are collected and enjoyed by many Lincoln lovers.

I of course cannot determine from here exactly what is causing your engine tapping or knocking sound but "if" it is caused by old dirty aged oil etc, as you are suggesting ( or hoping ) then fresh oil may indeed correct or at least improve the situation for you. If the noise is caused by a bent push rod, a broken valve spring, bad lifter or an engine bearing etc. then of course you will need to investigate deeper into the engine. The term OSU we are not familiar with.

As for the carburetor, all of the 79 Marks that we know of were equipped from FoMoCo with the 400 cid engine along with the Motorcraft 2 bbl 2150 carburetor. You are asking if the Edelbrock 1406 4bbl carburetor will "swap " on to this engine. You will need to replace your original 2bbl manifold with some sort of 4bbl manifold to do so. Why not correctly diagnose and possibly repair the sticking condition first before deciding to embark on such a radical change? The recall that you are referring to on the 77s would probably involve only the very popular 460 cid 4 bbl carbureted engines of that year.

Both of the issues that you are describing are not unique to Lincoln, therefore the same type of careful diagnosis should apply that you are familiar with on your Camaros and Cadillacs.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 26, 2015

1966 Lincoln Continental Electrical Issues

Good Afternoon,

I have a 1966 Lincoln Continental and replaced battery. Now the open door light on passenger side stays on and the driver open door lights doesn't come on when door is open. Also the "alt "gauge light stays lit while car is running. All the issues occurred after I changed to a brand new battery. The car seems to be running fine.

Thank you -

Vergel

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Greetings Vergel -

Automotive electrical issues sure can certainly play some strange tricks on us at times. However, the charging indicator and lighting issues that you are describing cannot occur because of or immediately after a simple battery replacement if in fact all that you have done was replace the battery. If you have merely disconnected the battery cables at the battery and then reinstalled them correctly on to a new or " good known" 12volt battery and not disturbed any other electrical components or performed any other electrical repairs etc. the above problems cannot happen at that time in my opinion. There must be some additional important information that you are not sharing with us that you can provide in order for us to help you better. Please include your model of 1966 Lincoln and how long you have owned it. If there is in fact no further information that you can provide then you must diagnose these problems as separate issues with the use of the correct wiring diagrams and electrical tests that are shown in the shop manual. I would begin though by properly testing the fuses and the fuse clips in the fuse panel with a 12v test light and with the ignition key in the on position. Any fuse links under the hood and any bulbs that are not working at any locations should be the next areas to check. Many local auto parts supply locations such as Autozone, Advance or Napa etc. are able to test your charging system components at no charge if you are unable to do so. Let us know what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 12, 2015

1966 Continental Bolt Torque Question

Hello Bill from Dallas TX,

I hope this email finds you well! I'm in the process of re-installing the main rear cap back on the block of my 462.

I have a torque wrench set to 95 FT LBS per the manual.

I can't go over 70 FT LBS and I'm afraid it will end up breaking the bolt inside the block.

Am I doing something wrong?

Can you please advise on what to do and what are the ramifications if I leave it at 70 FT LBS?

Your assistance is appreciated!

Thanks,

Alex

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Hi Alex -

If the rear main bearing cap bolt torque is 95 lbs. then it should be torqued to 95 lbs. psi. I do not understand your statement " I can't go over 70 lbs." Can you explain in a different way what is happening. Has the bolt started to strip the threads and become loose when you try to torque over 70 lbs. to the 95 lbs.? Will your torque wrench torque other bearing caps o/k or the lug nuts on your wheels to 95lbs. correctly? Is it defective? I cannot determine correctly from here from your information provided whether or not you are doing anything wrong, but in my opinion, leaving a bearing cap torqued at 70 lbs. when the actual correct spec. is 95-105 lbs. could possibly lead to problems if it loosens such as loss of oil pressure, knocking and subsequent engine failure.

To set your mind at ease another idea may be to contact a good local automotive engine rebuilder. For a reasonable fee someone from their shop could possibly visit you and give you a first hand professional opinion on the situation. When you have more information we may be able to help further if required.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 9, 2015

1971 Mark III Questions

Hi Bill -

I have a Mark III 71. It is absolutely fantastic to drive and ride in the summer here in Sweden. But I have a few faults I tried to fix but do not really know what I should do.
There is cruise control but when I activate this, I get no function to keep the speed. There's relay which I hear is activated when I press the activation when I stand still with the car. Could it be something electrical fault? Is there any deactivation via the brakes may have hung up ??? I have not been able to trace any vacuum leak. It would be very nice to have started this function again. The cruise control has never worked as long as I have owned this car (10 years).

The next problem is a little more teasing nature. The car's equipped with ACC. AC pump is not operating because no gas is left in the system. In contrast, the temperature control function in a slightly odd way. When it's really hot out there turned the heat on in the cockpit in full swing. When it gets cool the heating is switched off completely. Is this a common fault? What is the most likely error?

The car is as I said very nice to ride in but this is the wrong course draws down on comfort feeling.

I enclose a nice picture I took last year at a nostalgia petrol station here at home.

Thanks in advance
With best regards

Esbjörn

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Greetings Esbjorn -

That sure is a beautiful looking 71 Mark III.

The factory speed control and a/c units are nice options to have working on an older car. However if you or your mechanic are not familiar with these particular systems, proper diagnosis could prove difficult and even more so without the factory Shop Manuals. To answer your questions though many features are complicated and can be faulty in several areas and therefore need to be diagnosed using the shop manual. On these older Marks the speed control Regulators located under the hood with the speedometer cables attached to them are usually found to be at fault. The braking deactivation of the speed control when engaged is via the brake light switch located under the dash at the brake pedal linkage.

On your 1971 Mark (with the Automatic Climate Control A/C/Heat system) there is no provision to declutch the a/c compressor if the refrigerant charge is low or empty. The clutch will engage in all positions except OFF or if the ambient temperature drops below approximately 30-35 degrees F. There are very many causes of failures possible with the controls etc , and we do not know what if anything was done to the components in your Mark prior to or during your ownership. We find that most of these vehicles will however require rebuilding of the ACC boxes along with the blend door Servo and Switch assemblies and/or any of the several switches and relays. The shop manual along with good system operation knowledge, automotive electrical skills and refrigeration skills are necessary in order to perform meaningful diagnosis and to repair the many features of these older luxury vehicles. If we can help further with any needed literature or parts etc. please let us know.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 5, 2015

1969 Continental Cranking Issues

Hello -

My name is Undrea. I'm having a problem with my 1969 Lincoln Continental when the Lincoln is cold the car cranks very well but as soon as I drive it for while I cut the engine off it drags when I try to start it back up I have a brand-new starter brand- brand-new battery cables all new ground wires new distributor and distributor cap new points and is the drags after. all the new stuff I put on it but soon the car cools off It starts right back can you help me.

Thank you

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Greetings Undrea -

The only advice that I can offer after you have replaced all of these parts is that you will need to do the Starter Circuit tests as described in the Shop Manual. This will include the testing of all of the parts that you have replaced plus a complete test of the battery condition and its ability to supply power as well. Also be advised that the Lincolns of this era ground the battery in Two locations in the ground cable, one at the sub frame and one at the engine. Some vehicles are found to have the ground only at the one location and that will create a problem. The engine may also crank slowly when hot if your tune up specs are not accurate regarding timing and distributor point dwell. One other possibility is a loose Timing Chain, that could cause the issues that you describe. The above suggestions are good places to start.

Sincerely,

Bill

1966 Continental Parking Brake Issues

Bill,

I'm in the middle of restoring my Dad's 1966 4 door sedan. He was so proud of this car.

On several occasions, I was able to manually release the parking brake, like I never had a problem. ( I found out later that there is a vacuum release when bringing the transmission out of park. ) After working on the engine and changing fluids, I try to manually release the parking brake, and it doesn't budge. I've released the line going to the rear wheels thinking it would relieve the pressure to no avail. Even starting the vehicle and taking the trans out of park doesn't release it. Any ideas? Thanks in advance, sir.

Steve

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Hi Steve -

Sometimes these cables if not used for a long period of time can become seized inside of their casings and that may be the problem, but if you have been releasing it manually with success it is possible that the pedal actuator assembly has developed a mechanical problem. I would begin by carefully inspecting it closely to view the release mechanism to find out how the manual release lever trips the mechanism. Is it possible that the parking brake has been applied too tight and locked up ? You may find that a little lubricant at the right spot may correct the issue. Another tip is to apply further pressure on the pedal while using the manual release. After you correct this problem you can test the automatic release if necessary for a vacuum problem.

Sincerely,

Bill

1963 Continental Starting Issues

Hey Bill!

Big fan of your blog!

My 63 continental used to turn over and start fine but recently it stopped cranking. When I put the key in the lights, antenna, etc. all work but when I turn the key all the way then the lights all turn off and I hear a click under the glove box.

I've changed the following:

-battery
-alternator
-voltage regulator
-starter solenoid
-spark plugs and wires
-condenser for distributor
-fuses in fuse box in glove compartment
-battery cables

I even tried jumping the car to see if new battery was drained.

The clicking sounds like its coming from horn relay. Would this cause it to not start?

I've checked connections and they seem to be fine. Looks like previous owner replaced starter at some point because it says NAPA on it. Looks like previous owner replaced ignition at one point as well.

I disconnected the horns from passenger fender because I didn't want them and they were all rusted. I disconnected the wire plug cleanly.

It ran after I changed the condenser but when I tried a few days later I got nothing. All the parts I've replaced are for my make/model according to AutoZone and NAPA.

Any thoughts?

Thank you

Matt

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Greetings Matt -

You don't say if your engine has been recently running but from your description I would believe that you have a bad connection in the starting circuit and the click that you are hearing is an electrical snap as the circuits disconnect because of this this poor connection. The way it usually works is that the lights and other small electrical loads work fine until you try to crank the engine with the added load of the starter. The bad contact then instantly heats up and breaks the contact with an audible snap sound. After it cools the partial contact returns and the lights will operate once more. The bad connection is usually found at the positive battery post to cable area but could also be at or near the starter solenoid. You can begin by tracing the power from the battery positive post with a 12v test light immediately after you hear the snap and the power turns off. Before doing this though I would first inspect, clean and tighten the battery cables at the battery as this may be your only problem. I assume that your battery is in fact fully charged and in good shape as you describe. Diagnosis at your end to pinpoint the fault will be necessary.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 2, 2015

1971 Mark III Questions & Update

Bill,

The original fan shroud on my Mark III, while in pretty good condition overall and the cooling system operational, is split from front to back through the bottom edge and broken where the bolts fasten it to the radiator on the upper edge. I'd like to remove this shroud to make long-term repairs and clean up that area while I'm restoring the engine bay. However, I cannot determine for sure how to properly remove it. The shop manual only mentions removing it from the radiator in order to remove the fan drive clutch, but it appears there isn't room to completely remove the shroud while the fan is still in place since the fan is in pretty close proximity to the back of the radiator. It seems the only way to remove the shroud is to first remove the fan drive clutch and fan as an assembly from the water pump hub in front of the belt via four hex screws. This looks necessary in order to free up space to pull the shroud up and out. The manual mentions loosening the fan belt, but I don't see why that would be necessary. Is my assumption correct, or am I missing an easier way to remove the shroud? Also, is removing the fan drive clutch a riskier process than it appears?

Bradley

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Bradley -

You are correct, the fan and clutch should be removed first in order to avoid further damage to the shroud or radiator. I would loosen the fan bolts first before loosening the belts. If you do remove the clutch and fan without loosening the belts at all, the re-installation with the tight belts will be very difficult. The shroud and fan assembly can be lifted out together when the necessary bolts are removed if the clearances are too tight. The whole job is actually quite easy.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill,

The clearance between the top of the fan and shroud is almost 1.5" compared to only 1/8" at the bottom, so I am looking into replacing the motor mounts, thinking that might raise the engine and fan. I inspected the situation from underneath the car, and the rubber looks to be solid and in good condition with the original numbers visible. I attached a picture of each side.

1. If they looked cracked or compressed, I'd feel more confident that they actually need to be replaced. Should sagging mounts show their worn out condition on the vehicle?

2. Also, and the driver's side looks pretty easy to get to, however access to the passenger side is hampered by the Sure-Track system and emissions canister. The shop manual 21-24-04 makes no mention of these obstacles, so can you advise me of any tricks to changing those motor mounts?

3. The manual also instructs to position a wood block between a jack and the front area of the oil pan and raise and support the engine with the jack. It seems risky to me to use the oil pan for support, so I have to ask if you agree or is there a safer way?

4. Finally, should these bolts that are to be torqued be oiled prior to re-installation as mentioned, or do they require oil or water-resistant sealer?

Thank you.

Bradley

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Bradley -

Your motor mounts look OK and well shaped in your photos. In fact they appear to not be very old. Without seeing any thing else I would say that you need to check your shroud installation. It may not be seated correctly at the bottom or distorted from your recent repair and cannot be installed properly? Only someone viewing this situation on scene will be able to pinpoint the actual problem now.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 29, 2014

1971 Mark III Power Steering Leak

Bill,

I am experiencing minor power steering fluid leaks on my 71 Mark III. I am assuming that the fluid path starts through the hose with the metal tubing between the pump and the steering box and then through the wiper motor. From there, another hose with a one metal fitting on the wiper motor connects to a cooler with a regular hose clamp. Finally, another hose without any metal tubing connects the cooler to the lower section of the pump. Is this what is referred to as the return hose? I seem to be experiencing most of the leakage from this last rubber hose connection at the pump, with some minor residue seeping through both of the hoses where they connect to the cooler. None of the other threaded connections are leaking, but there is slight fluid residue seeping out of the rubber-to-metal connections on the other hoses.

I have reviewed the shop manual and not found much guidance, so I'm interested in knowing if changing the all-rubber hose is as easy as taking it off and replacing it with a high likelihood of sealing the most significant leak. Also, if I decide to change all the hoses, is there a trick to disconnecting them from the wiper motor? They are so tight, I'm afraid to put any more pressure for fear of damaging the wiper motor or its fittings.


Bradley

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Greetings Bradley -

The power steering return hoses at some of the pumps and coolers usually have clamps that are similar to heater hose clamps that can be tightened to correct most seepage or leaks. If not or if the hose is deteriorated, the hose assembly will need to be replaced as a unit. There is no real " trick " to removing the other hoses and steel lines from the system. It is a good idea to use quality open end wrenches or line wrenches in some cases and to definitely use a back up wrench in the appropriate locations to avoid twisting and ruining other components that the lines are attached to. You should position yourself in the best comfortable area to have excellent leverage and control of the wrenches in order to initially " break" the coupling loose. They may be very tight because they may have been on there for a long while or a previous owner or his mechanic may have over tightened them.

Sincerely,

Bill

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