October 17, 2014

1964 Continental Sedan Deck Lid Hinge

Dear Bill,

I've been browsing the very educational archives of Bill's Corner and am hoping that you can steer me towards fixing something very annoying about my '64 sedan. When I close the trunk lid the left hinge feels as though it's binding - there's always a small 'thud' sound and a shudder. This never happens when I open the trunk lid. I checked the hinge up close with a LED torch but couldn't see anything out of place, nor could see any way to make adjustments. To my amateur eyes the tension rod/spring seems to be installed correctly.

Stumped in The Netherlands

Reijer

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Hello Reijer,

We can't leave you " stumped in the Netherlands"

If you are sure that the rods are installed correctly we would do exactly as you have done....observe that hinge area movement. We would however do this with the help of an assistant (to make sure that you are not locked inside). While you are inside with a good flashlight you need relax and carefully observe all of the movement at the point of the "thud" sound as the assistant operates the trunk lid in order to identify the exact location. Many times a dab of grease or oil in the exact spot will correct these issues. Other times careful and close inspection may reveal some sort of wear at any pivot point or incorrect rod installation that you will need to address. As a further precaution the use of safety glasses for your eyes is also a good idea when you are near these torsion rods. Note...On some installations a clip is used to Tie the torsion rods together at a point near the center under the rear glass. Let us know what you find out.

Sincerely,

Bill

1963 Continental Powering Steering Pump Questions

Hi Bill,

I have put my second rebuilt power steering pump on my 1963 continental. The first ones default was blamed on improper bleeding. The current one works, but pushes fluid out of the reservoir were fluid is added. Do you think this a bleeding issue or is there a blockage issue?

Thanks,

Jeff

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Greetings Jeff,

You don't tell us the original reason for replacing the pump or if the second replacement was the ONLY one pushing fluid out of the reservoir. If it was dumping fluid on all three pumps I would suspect a blockage somewhere. If you do suspect blockage, the filter in the reservoir, incorrect filter or incorrect filter installation could cause this. If only one pump was dumping out of the reservoir I would then suspect an interior pump problem with that pump. A pump that has an improperly installed seal could be aerating and foaming the fluid. This is not uncommon and can result in the fluid foaming and overflowing at the reservoir without leaking at the pump itself. When replacing these pumps it is difficult to "improperly bleed" them. The worst scenario is to run them dry in any way. Check out the above suggestions and if you need to, email us with further information. Did you speak with the people that overhauled your pump regarding these issues?

Sincerely,

Bill

October 9, 2014

1971 Mark III Headlight Door Issues

Hi Bill -

Need suggestions, have a customer that just bought a 39k car from a estate sale, problem is headlight doors creep up after car is shut off. Have checked vacuum lines and supply tank - any ideas where to go next? Any help would be nice. Customer did say they will come up while driving.

Thanks,

Don

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Hi Don,

As we have written on previous posts the headlamp covers are operated by vacuum as you already know. A built in safety system causes the covers to fail in the open position and with larger leaks the covers will open sooner. Therefore the only way to find the leaks is to inspect ALL of the areas that vacuum is routed to for the vacuum headlamp control circuit. The best way and the most sensible method is with the use of the correct vacuum diagram a hand vacuum pump and some knowledge of how the system operates. Our experience is that a leak or any combination of several leaks can be found at any components that the vacuum for the covers and controls is sent to. These are.... the two Vacuum Motors at the covers, Reservoir, Vacuum Check Valve, Headlamp Switch, Manual Valve (near reservoir) and any Hose or Junction in the circuit. All of the above necessary components must be installed correctly and all are candidates for failures.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 6, 2014

1966 Lincoln Continental Starter Issues & Follow Up...

Hello Bill,

I have a 1966 Lincoln Continental that I'm restoring. For some reason the starter keeps trying to start the car after I turn the key off. I've put on a new starter and new starter solenoid. Have any idea why it could be doing this?

Thanks for any help,

Doug

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Hello Doug -

If I am understanding you correctly, the engine runs fine until you shut it off. At that time the engine turns off but the starter then engages with the key in the off position and then proceeds to crank the engine as you state " For some reason the Starter keeps trying to start the car after I turn the key off". This would be unusual as the ignition switch would at that time need to send power to the starter solenoid S wire with the key in the off position. If this is true I would first want to test the ignition switch for a possible short inside in the off position. The other much more common scenario occurs with a running engine when with the key turned to the ignition off position the engine continues to run slowly and rough for a short period of time and then finally stops. This can happen when the engine is at normal hot operating temperature but the engine idle speed is much too high This is known as engine "run on" or "dieseling". Adjusting the idle speed will usually correct this issue. Which of the above describes your problem accurately?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Actually I haven't got the car running yet. It turns over fine but when I turn the key off it will keep trying to turn over.

Doug

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Doug -

Oh oh, slightly different wording. That changes things. The new starter solenoid could have temporarily fused itself inside because of long periods of engine cranking, high starter draw, poor battery cables, low battery charge or poor quality solenoid. If you tap the solenoid when this happens and the cranking stops when and IF the fused contact inside the solenoid do release, you will have found the problem. Next step is to correct the cause by testing and being absolutely sure that the above items (starter , cables, battery and solenoid) are in very good order and up to the task. Long periods of slow cranking with a tight engine and a high draw starter can and usually will be detrimental to the starting circuit.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 1, 2014

1979 Mark V Electrical Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a Collectors Series Mark V that until lately was trouble free, however, one recent night the headlights stopped working. I was about 5 miles from home when the headlights and dash lights went black and the switch was non responsive. I did some research and thought that the headlight switch needed replaced so I purchased one from Lincoln Land and installed it but nothing changed. After that the fuses and circuit breakers were replaced but that didn't make a difference.

The car starts and runs fine but there are no headlights, parking lights, or interior lights. The brake lights do work as do the hazard flashers. When we lost the lights several other things quit working as well: headlight doors, power seats, passenger compartment lighting, seat back releases, power locks (windows work).

Any idea what I should try next?

Thank you in advance.

Rob

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Hello Rob -

Your question should not be " any idea what I should TRY next?" but it should be " how can I DIAGNOSE this electrical problem?" The only way to diagnose a problem such as this is to trace the power path of the lighting circuit etc. with the use of the correct wiring diagram at your side and a 12v test light. Guessing and replacing parts until the fault goes away is costly and time consuming. Your problem could turn out to be as simple as a bad connection at a junction or a failed fuse link near the starter relay under the hood. Fuse links are special lengths of fuse wire that is carefully spliced into the power distribution area usually near the battery. You will need to read the diagram correctly and know the location of the items to be examined and tested. The above method is the best and only way find the culprit. Let us know what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 26, 2014

1966 Lincoln Continental Cooling Issues

Hi Bill,

Let me start by saying; I believe any classic Lincoln enthusiast would agree that you, and your forum are invaluable, and the staff at Lincoln Land provides some of the best customer service I've experienced.

So, here's my situation. I live in Phoenix, and at the beginning of the summer i got out of my car after driving about 15-20 miles, and a few minutes later, i saw coolant running steadily from all over the front of my car. I waited until the car was cooled down (6-7 hours) and checked the expansion reservoir and it was dry. Long story short, after a bit of simple trouble shooting (thermostat, radiator cap, hoses, observation...) i finally discovered a hair line crack about 1.5" long about 3 inches down, along the right side of my transmission cooler, i wasn't stressing because i intended on overhauling the entire thing anyway. I need help with determining whats best for the life and efficiency of this car because i am getting mixed signals. Is it worth it to buy new, particular replacement parts, or refurbish the original parts? if yes, what would you recommend?

Side question. what is your opinion on aftermarket carbs if i am looking for, 1. efficiency 2. fuel economy? have you ever seen a 66 fuel injected? (not sure if that's possible.

Thanks again, you guys are the best -

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Greetings -

We are glad that you enjoy the blog. New parts when they are available from FORD are of course the best way to go with many items but now after 48 years, they are scarce. Many new parts are still available from quality aftermarket suppliers. We try to choose the best of the best for our customers when we can while offering alternatives according to the owners specific wishes.

Your radiator can be serviced properly by a good known radiator shop in your area. Depending on the condition of your radiator they will repair the leak and "rod out the core"or if it has suffered from poor coolant maintenance over the years and is a high mileage car it may require replacement of the core. In any case a good shop will advise you honestly and correctly.

Again, and according to your car's odometer reading your carburetor can be cleaned and successfully serviced internally if you have a carburetor issue. However, many owners have been very pleased with installing the available aftermarket new carburetors when their original carburetors are worn out. A new carburetor is the best choice in many cases. Please contact us for further information on any service or replacement parts.

We cannot offer any information on a fuel injection installation for a 1966 Lincoln. Inquiries such as this at Lincoln Land are rare and we usually refer our customers to the engine specialty shops for the latest product information.

The best fuel efficiency on older luxury collector vehicles such as yours can be realistically attained by maintaining a high state of accurate tune up conditions on your engine along with good driving habits. These engines were not designed with a great measure of "fuel economy" in mind . In our experience, spending a great deal of money in this regard only results in a lighter wallet for the owner.

Please call for any further information that you may require.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 25, 2014

1970 Mark III Ignition Concerns

Bill -

I have a 1970 MK III, with a later model tilt steering wheel; Not sure what year.

Problem is that the ignition switch has gotten progressively harder and harder to turn. The key tumbler has been replaced. I had the steering column removed and thoroughly cleaned and a new igniting switch down on the lower column installed. Was a little better, but over time has gotten worse.

Oddly it gets much worse in very cold weather. Another clue is that it is a little easier to turn the key when I tilt the wheel all the way down.

Any ideas what may be the problem?

Thanks,

Paul

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Hi Paul -

Not knowing what steering column you have I would remove the key tumbler and operate the unit with a screw driver blade and check for binding. If it still binds I would then disconnect the ignition switch on lower part of the column and recheck the operation. If it still binds then you will know that you have a problem behind the tumbler area. The inside of the upper column would then need to be inspected. If the binding stops when either the tumbler or the ign. is disconnected you will have uncovered the problem location at that point. If it is easier to operate with the wheel tilted to another position as you have stated, I would think that the problem would be some sort of interference or damage inside the hub near the tilt mechanism or the locking pin that locks the steering wheel. In any case you would need to isolate the bind as I have suggested above and then examine that suspected area closely and repair as necessary. Sometimes a dab of grease in the right spot can correct the issue.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 15, 2014

1965 Continental Possible Carb Issues?

Hi Bill,

I was hoping you could help me. My Lincoln (430) was having carburetor issues, at least so I thought. I bolted up a new 600cfm Edelbrock and am having similar issues. Popping thru exhaust and run on sometimes. Any help or direction will be appreciated. New plugs, wires, points, condensor.

Thank you,

Geri

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Hello Geri -

Your symptom information is a little sparse so other than common and accurate tune up diagnosis and the possibility of timing chain issues etc., I am going to refer you to our January 21, 2013 blog question and reply below:


1965 Continental Is Sluggish

Hi Bill,

I have been working on a customers 65 Continental for a couple of months now. He brought it to me saying it shut off on him one day and when he started it back up it was running rough and had little power. I have have been through this thing in and out, top and bottom. Did all the usual diagnosis stuff and have changed parts as I have found defects. The car was running rough at idle and would break up real bad when trying to accelerate, popping back back through the carburetor and smelling very rich. The first thing I did was rebuild the distributor, it wasn't advancing and the plate was very corroded. That didn't help at all. I pulled the timing cover to check the chain and marks and that was fine so I pulled the intake and discovered the lifters were seizing in the bores. I cleaned the bores, installed a new camshaft, lifters and timing chain set. While I had it that far down I sent the heads to the machine shop and 500 bucks later they were fixed with a few valves and all new springs. All the rockers are free and pushrods not bent. After all that the car idles as smooth as a brand new car, but still have no power and can barely accelerate. New coil, 12 volts to the coil, new cap and rotor, timing set at 10 degrees ( have tried it from 6 to 16 degrees), 5-6psi fuel pressure at the carb, new helper fuel pump near the tank, compression is 130-140 on every cylinder after warm-up. After all this the car still has very little power, breaks up during acceleration and is still slightly popping through the carburetor at WOT. You can see a mist of fuel with a flashlight coming out of the top of the carb while power breaking it at half throttle. I've hit a brick wall with this one, its the first 430 Ive ever worked on, I'm too far in it to stop now. Any ideas or advice? Thanks so much.

Andy

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Greetings Andy -

After reviewing your letter several times and reading what you have done so far with this engine and assuming that all of your work has been done correctly as per the engine's specifications etc. I can offer the following. The factory exhaust systems on these engines use a " double wall" exhaust pipe. These of course are the pipes that bolt up to the exhaust manifolds and continue on to the next flange connection rearward. It is not unheard of for the inner pipe to develop a separation in such a way as to severely seal up the exhaust on one side enough to cause the symptoms that you are describing. When this occurs the outer wall remains intact and no exhaust leak is heard. Because of the exhaust heat factor this final "plug up" can take place in a very short period of time as your customer has described to you. If the vehicle has the original style pipes on it you should remove them for a careful internal inspection.

Two other items to be aware of when tuning or servicing this era of engine are...The damper pulley on the crankshaft can separate from the rubber damper material and give you an incorrect timing reading. These are available rebuilt. The second is that the vacuum advance units on the distributor are well known to seize or rupture and become inoperative. These are available new.

I hope that the above helps you and I would ask you to let us know here at Lincoln Land what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

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1965 Continental Is Sluggish - Update

Bill I can't thank you enough for the advice, I unbolted the exhaust just before the muffler's and sure enough the passenger side exhaust pipe was clogged shut. I ran 2 new pipes from the manifolds to the mufflers and the car runs perfect!! I've run into double walled exhaust pipe problems before but 99% of those cases were on Honda's. I had no idea these Lincolns were manufactured with it and probably never would have checked it.

Thanks again,

Andy.


Does that sound at all similar to your problems? It will be necessary for someone to perform precise and meaningful diagnosis in order to avoid replacing parts that are not faulty.

Run on is usually caused by too fast of an engine idle but correcting your main concern may also eliminate the run on. Let us know what you find out.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 9, 2014

1995 Town Car Shifter Won't Move

Bill -

When I start the engine and try to put it in gear, but the shifter won't move. I have to turn the key without turning on the car to get it to move. Then have to fire up in neutral. What can I do?

Sincerely,

Luke

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Luke -

This is not an uncommon problem. That system that won't allow you to shift from Park is known as " shift lock". It is operated electrically by the brake light switch under the dash and therefore your brake lights may also be inoperative. It is possible that the switch is out of adjustment, faulty or disconnected etc. and can be an easy fix in most cases. If you are repairing it yourself you will need to check that switch first with a test light and a wiring diagram. If you are not skilled in these repairs you can have it serviced by any local automotive repair shop. I would ask them first if they are familiar with this "shift lock" feature before allowing them to repair it though. As mentioned above, this problem is well known in the trade so you should make sure that the shop is capable in order to save yourself unnecessary costly diagnostic expense.

Sincerely,

Bill

1963 Continental Engine Noise

Hi Bill,

My 1963 Continental just had the engine completely rebuilt; all new bearings, a valve job, new lifters, gaskets, etc. At the same time the carburetor, alternator, power steering pump, water pump, fan clutch, fuel pump, all hoses and belts were replaced (or rebuilt). The engine is working well except for an annoying rhythmic squeak when it is idling and up to temperature. When the engine is cold, there is no discernible noise. And, the squeak either goes away at higher RPMs, or is covered by the sound from the engine and fan.

The noise appears to be coming from the right front of the engine and seems to be internal rather than external. I have used a mechanics stethoscope to try to locate the noise with little success. The only time I seem to be able to hear it is at the intake manifold at the front where the first attaching bolt is located. But even that is questionable. Any thoughts?


Steve

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Hello Steve -

An internal squeak from an engine that has recently been rebuilt as you describe sounds like a vital part is not being lubricated properly. The car should really be sent by flatbed truck to the rebuilders of the engine for them to diagnose before possible damage can occur. If you wish to check a few possibilities yourself you could do the following. Install a " master oil pressure gauge" to the oil pressure switch port on the engine, remove the valve covers and observe the oil pressure as the engine warms to full operating temperature. The oil pressure should be well into the correct specification for a freshly rebuilt engine if all is well. At the same time you can visually inspect the upper engine for correct oiling action and possibly diagnose a problem in this area.

Sincerely,

Bill

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